Photo of Rick Amasino
Apr 07, 2006

Professor Amasino, who was recently named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor, is a professor of biochemistry. His lab focuses on studies of how plants respond to seasonal cues to prompt flowering.

Photo of Hector DeLuca
Apr 06, 2006

The University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2005 was the nation's fifth most productive intellectual property setting among U.S. universities, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) announced.

Photo of Dave Nelson
Apr 05, 2006

The award pays tribute to Professor Nelson's impressive dedication as a teacher, and his ability to communicate his subject matter and inspire students enthusiasm for learning.

Photo of Bill Reznikoff
Apr 03, 2006

The Arthur J. Maurer Extra Mile Award recognizes faculty and staff who have demonstrated unusual concern for and provided exceptional service to students over and above their regular responsibilities. It was established in honor of the late Arthur Maurer, a professor of poultry science for 28 years who passed away unexpectedly in 1998, by his wife Ellen.

Congratulations Professor Reznikoff

Photo of Rick Amasino
Apr 02, 2006

Just as a non-musician savors the resounding strains of a Beethoven symphony, University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemist Richard Amasino believes that non-scientists can appreciate the role of science in their lives.

Photo of Julie Mitchell
Mar 01, 2006

Julie C. Mitchell, assistant professor of biochemistry and mathematics. Mitchell's research will develop an integrated analytical platform for the functional discovery of novel neural peptides.

Photo of Ron Raines
Feb 01, 2006

A team of scientists from UW-Madison, writing this week (Feb. 13, 2006) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reports the discovery of a method for making human collagen in the lab.

Photo of NMRFAM research team
Jan 03, 2006

University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemists have developed an approach that allows them to measure with unprecedented accuracy the strengths of hydrogen bonds in a protein. The scientists were then able to predict the function of different versions of the protein based on structural information, a novel outcome that was published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Photo of Mike Sussman
Jan 02, 2006

University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemist Mike Sussman has been elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The AAAS Council elected 376 members as Fellows of AAAS. These individuals will be recognized for their contributions to science at the Fellows Forum to be held on 18 February 2006 during the AAAS Annual Meeting in St. Louis.

Photo of Rick Amasino
Jan 01, 2006

University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemist Richard Amasino has been elected by his peers to lead the American Society of Plant Biologists. Amasino became president-elect of ASPB Oct. 1, 2005. ASPB is a non-profit science society of nearly 6,000 members from the United States and nearly 60 other nations.

Photo of Tom Record
Oct 01, 2005

Thomas Record, a biophysical chemist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been named one of six 2006 Society Fellows by the Biophysical Society, a 7,000-member U.S. organization that represents global biophysics research.

A chaired professor of chemistry and biochemistry, Record hopes that the new honor will help in continuing to attract talented students and extramural funding for his research.

A UW-Madison faculty member for 35 years, Record is a basic scientist whose laboratory has long explored how cell proteins recognize and bind to DNA sequences, a critical...

Photo of John Markley
Sep 03, 2005

University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemists have developed an approach that allows them to measure with unprecedented accuracy the strengths of hydrogen bonds in a protein. The scientists were then able to predict the function of different versions of the protein based on structural information, a novel outcome that was published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Photo of Ivan Rayment
Sep 02, 2005

Vibrantly colored creatures from the depths of the South Pacific Ocean harbor toxins that potentially can act as powerful anti-cancer drugs, according to research findings from University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemists and their Italian colleagues.

The research team has defined the structure of the toxins and provided a basic understanding that can be used to synthesize pharmaceuticals, according to a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

CESG logo
Jun 01, 2005

Researchers at the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics, based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, have received a $20 million award to fund Phase II of the Protein Structure Initiative over the next five years.
 

May 18, 2005

Graduate Teaching Excellence Award: David W. Staple
This award is intended to recognize a Biochemistry graduate student who has consistently shown evidence of quality, commitment, and innovation in teaching. Graduate students who have completed their Biochemistry major teaching requirements are eligible. Nominations are requested from all instructors of Biochemistry classes with graduate teaching assistants. Nominations for students who have assisted in more than one class during their two semesters of required teaching should be presented as joint nominations between all involved...

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