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Three Biochemistry Faculty Receive Department and College Professorships

This academic year, six College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) faculty members were selected to receive CALS or department professorships/chairships. Three of these faculty members work in the Department of Biochemistry. Read more below.

 

Sam ButcherPhoto of Sam Butcherhas been appointed as the Steenbock Research Professor in Biomolecular Structure, an appointment that includes salary and research support for five years. The Steenbock Research Professorship in Biomolecular Structure was established in 1965 when Evelyn Steenbock allocated an endowment from the Steenbock WARF accounts for its creation. Butcher’s research program combines x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy techniques to gain insight into the structure and function of RNA and ribonucleoprotein complexes in cells.

 

 

Katherine Henzler-WildmanPhoto Katherine Henzler-Wildman has been appointed as the Jean V. Thomas Professor in Biochemistry, which provides research and scholarly activity support for five years. This professorship was established through the estate of Jean V. Thomas, a UW–Madison alumna who enjoyed a 40-year career, becoming a successful leader in science and business. Henzler-Wildman, director of the National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM), utilizes solid state NMR techniques coupled with in vitro and in vivo assays to provide critical insights into the function of ion channels in biological systems.

 

Aaron HoskinsPhoto of Aaron Hoskins has been appointed as the Wasson Professor in Biochemistry of Higher Animals, which provides research and scholarly activity support for five years. The Wasson Professorship in Biochemistry was established through the estate of Louis W. and Laura S. Wasson to support research in the field of biochemistry with particular emphasis in the field of nutrition. Hoskins’ program focuses on expanding our understanding of gene expression in eukaryotic cells, including through the development of novel techniques to explore new questions. The single molecule assays developed by his team has allowed new insights into spliceosome complex assembly and function.

 

Read the original story from CALS here. Photo: Robin Davies.