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Protein Suggests a New Strategy to Thwart Infection
(posted 07/06/15)

The newest publication from the Kiessling lab, authored by Darryl Wesener in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, was featured by UW-Madison News. The study describes the ability of intelectin, a human protein found in the intestines and lungs, to distinguish between human and microbial cells based on their differing carbohydrate coat.
See the UW-Madison coverage here and the full article here.

Darryl Wesener Wins at WARF Discovery Challenge
(posted 05/19/15)

Congratulations to Darryl Wesener from the Kiessling Lab for his top research proposal at the recent WARF Discovery Challenge.

The Discovery Challenge, part of the WARF Student Ambassador Program, is a two-part research competition for UW–Madison graduate students and postdoctoral researchers from all departments and fields of study. It aims to promote cross-disciplinary research and provides a forum for students to share research results, exchange ideas, improve their communication skills and seek new collaborators. It consists of a research symposium on April 9, followed by a research award competition held in fall 2015. More information here.


In Directing Stem Cells, Study Shows Context Matters
(posted 09/12/14)

A recent Kiessling Lab publication in PNAS authored by Samira Musah was featured by the UW-Madison News. The research shows that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate. See the UW-Madison coverage here and the full article here.


Kiessling Lab Alumni Featured in Chemical & Engineering News 
(posted 09/30/13)

Laura Strong and David Mann were both featured in an article about the changing biotech market in the U.S. and the shift of jobs for chemists to the midwest.  The article from the September 23, 2013 issue of Chemical & Engineering  article can be seen here.


Kiessling receives 2013 Murray Goodman Memorial Prize 
(posted 12/03/12)

Laura Kiessling will be awarded a $10,000 prize, commemorative plaque, and a dinner in her honor at an award symposium during the fall 2013 ACS National Meeting in Indianapolis. This prize, presented by the Biophysical Society in partnership with the ACS Division of Biological Chemistry, recognizes seminal contributions in the area of molecular glycobiology and carbohydrate biochemistry.


Kiessling receives Claude S. Hudson Award
(posted 10/17/12)

Laura Kiessling was awarded the 2013 National ASC Division Award in Carbohydrate Chemistry. The Claude S. Hudson Award was stablished by the Division in 1946 to recognize outstanding contributions to carbohydrate chemistry in education, research, or applications. This biennial award is presented in odd-numbered years.


Kiessling named American Chemical Society Fellow
(posted 09/07/10)

Laura Kiessling was named an American Chemical Society (ACS) Fellow at the 2010 Fall National Meeting in Boston. She was honored for her outstanding contributions to the field of chemistry as a distinguished scientist and as a volunteer who has devoted her time to support ACS activities.  Nominees represent a wide range of technical areas and include scientists from academia, industry and government.


Carb synthesis sheds light on promising tuberculosis drug target, by Jill Sakai
(posted 06/22/09)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

A fundamental question about how sugar units in bacteria are strung together into long carbohydrate chains has lead researchers in the Kiessling Group to identify a promising way to target new medicines against tuberculosis (TB). Working with components of the TB bacterium, researchers identified an unusual process by which an important structural carbohydrate with the right number of sugars in the chain is built. In addition to providing insight into what may be a general mechanism for designing and building carbohydrates, the work gives insight into developing new therapeutics against TB.


Carroll, Kiessling named Fellows of Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters
(posted 06/02/08)
From the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Evolutionary biologist Sean Carroll and biochemist Laura Kiessling have been named as 2008 Fellows of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. ...Fellows are named  for their qualities of judgment, perceptiveness, and knowledge of how literature, art, and science contribute to the cultural life and welfare of the state. ...She (Kiessling) is noted for her insights into chemical and biological processes, her excellence as a teacher and mentor of young scientists, and her local and national leadership in the chemical and biological sciences.


Kiessling chosen as Guggenheim Fellow, by Madeline Fisher
(posted 04/09/08)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Four professors at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have received 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship Awards, which recognize artists, scholars and scientists based on distinguished past achievement and exceptional future promise.  ...As a Guggenheim  Fellow,  Kiessling proposes to expand the scope of a type of chemical synthesis, called alkene metathesis, which she believes could offer a powerful new way to monitor the condition and function of cells.


New technique dissects stem cells' picky likes, dislikes, by Madeline Fisher
(posted 05/04/07)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Kiessling and her colleagues describe a system that can quickly and systematically screen hundreds of individual molecules for their ability to influence stem cell fates. ...Moreover, her team's chemistry-based techniques not only allows scientists to test molecules from nature, but synthetic ones, as well.


Laura Kiessling elected to the National Academy of Sciences, by Jill Sakai
(posted 05/01/07)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Laura Kiessling is among 72 new fellows admitted to the 144-year old academy in recognition of their distinguished achievements and ongoing contributions to original research.


Targeting tumors the natural way, by Madeline Fisher
(posted 03/26/07)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

By mimicking Nature's way of distinguishing one type of cell from another, University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists now report they can more effectively seek out and kill cancer cells while sparing healthy ones.


UW spinoff company to receive MIT technology awards
(posted 03/06/07)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The MIT Club of Wisconsin, a state association for alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is recognizing a University of Wisconsin-Madison based spinoff company..

The club will recognize Quintessence Biopharmaceuticals of Madison, a company that grew out of the advances of UW-Madison chemistry and biochemistry professors Laura Kiessling and Ron Raines. Quintessence is an early-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on development of human therapeutics.


ACS Chemical Biology journal honored
(posted 03/08/07)

ACS Chemical Biology, edited by Laura Kiessling, has won the 2006 Award for Innovation in Journal Publishing from the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers, The association is the national trade association of the U.S. book publishing industry, including more than 300 major commercial publishers, small publishers, non-profits, university presses and scholarly societies.

The journal was also the runner-up for the R.R. Hawkins Award for the Outstanding Professional, Reference or Scholarly Work of 2006


Biochem Postdoc receives NIH award
(posted 11/02/06)

Matt Allen from the Raines and Kiessling labs is one of the first 58 recipients of the new NIH Pathways to Independence award.


Professor receives prestigious award for contributions to chemistry, by Terry Devitt
(posted 10/23/06)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Laura Kiessling has won the 2005 Harrison Howe Award, a prize that annually honors outstanding contributions to the field of chemistry.


Professor Laura Kiessling to be appointed as a Hilldale Professor
(posted 05/04/06)

We are delighted to announce that Laura Kiessling will be appointed Hilldale Professor effective July 2006. A Hilldale Professor is one of the highest honors that a faculty member at UW can achieve, and Hilldale Professors are selected through an extremely competitive University wide process. This appointment is fitting and wonderful recognition for Laura's outstanding contributions to the Department, the College of Letters and Science, and the University, through her seminal research in chemical biology, her spectacular teaching and mentoring, and her many extramural activities including Editor-in-Chief of the ACS journal Chemical Biology and service on a number of advisory boards and panels.


Kiessling to lead new chemical biology initiative
(posted 05/09/2005)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The world's largest scientific society, the American Chemical Society, has named Laura L. Kiessling editor in chief of ACS Chemical Biology, a new publication scheduled to launch in 2006. Kiessling is professor of chemistry and biochemistry and MacArthur Foundation Fellow at UW-Madison.


Wisconsin chemists find a new chink in TB's armor, by Terry Devitt
(posted 05/09/04)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The family of bacteria that causes tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy are notoriously sturdy. And although the diseases they cause have been held in check for the past 50 years by antibiotics, some strains are becoming increasingly resistant to existing therapy.

Now, however, a new chink has been found in the cellular armor that makes these infectious diseases difficult to treat. The discovery, reported today (May 9) in the online editions of the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology by a team of chemists and biochemists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, opens the door to the development of a new family of antibiotics to treat diseases that still claim as many as 3 million lives annually worldwide.

"Most of the treatments we have for these diseases date from the 1950s," says Laura L. Kiessling, a UW-Madison professor of chemistry and the leader of the team reporting the new discovery. "Many traditional antibiotics don't work against tuberculosis."


Three faculty named AAAS fellows, by Emily Carlson
(posted 10/24/02)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Three members of the faculty have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

They include Robert M. Goodman, professor of plant pathology; Richard D. Vierstra, professor of horticulture; and Laura L. Kiessling, professor of chemistry and biochemistry.


Short-circuiting microbe chat, by Terry Devitt
(posted 01/02/02)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Bacteria - and other types of cells - use receptors on their surface to sense their environment and, like a human nose, pick up chemical cues from a distance, says Laura L. Kiessling, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry and senior author of the paper.


Sticky Situations (pdf file) by Alisa Zapp Machalek
(posted Feb-01)
From the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health.

By studying how cells stick to blood vessels and other surfaces, Laura Kiessling is trying to understand inflammation and Alzheimer's Disease.


Foundation supports chemical genomics center
(posted Jan-01)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

A $1.5 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation will enable the university to establish a center of research for the study and application of chemical genomics, a dynamic new field combining chemistry and molecular biology.

Chiefly responsible for securing support for the center are professor Laura L. Kiessling, principal investigator on the project, and assistant professor Peter J. Belshaw, who with Kiessling co-authored the grant proposal. Both hold joint appointments in chemistry and biochemistry.


Two from UW-Madison receive "genius grants"
(posted 23-Jun-99)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

In a rare event, two faculty members at UW-Madison have received word that they'll get national "genius grants" awarded to individuals whose work and accomplishments set lofty standards for creativity and promise.

Jill Banfield, a geologist, and Laura Kiessling, a chemist, are among 32 people named MacArthur Fellows today (Tuesday, June 22) by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.


Sugary Molecules Hold Promise for Fighting Inflammation, by Alison Davis
(posted 1-Mar-99)
From the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health.

A few years ago, NIGMS grantee Dr. Laura Kiessling of the University of Wisconsin-Madison had a hunch that causing L-selectin molecules on immune cells to cluster together might send a signal to the cells clean-up crews to clip the molecules from the cell surface. By doing so, the cells would lose critical "docking sites" that normally render the cells capable of sticking to each other--a key step in setting off an inflammatory response.


New agents may provide inflammation, pain relief
(posted 4-Mar-98)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Trying a new approach to controlling the process of inflammation, UW-Madison scientists have forged a new class of synthetic molecules that offer a new strategy for treating pain, swelling and the other hallmarks of injury or illness.

Writing this week (March 5) in the scientific journal Nature, UW-Madison chemist Laura L. Kiessling describes a new family of compounds that packs a novel one-two punch that effectively inhibits the cellular processes that cause us pain.


Disarming Alzheimer's Toxic Proteins
(posted 14-Apr-97)
From the Office of News and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

A new study of the proteins that may be responsible for the brain lesions associated with Alzheimer's disease promises a new understanding of its underlying cause, and may someday yield new treatments for the devastating and deadly disease.

Results of the study, reported here today at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, reveal a potential new pathway to understanding and treating Alzheimer's, a disease of the brain that afflicts 4 million Americans and for which there is now no definitive treatment and no cure.